The Start of The Year 2013 on The Six (6) Season Calendar was 28 DEC 2012

Discussion in 'Ancient, Indigenous, & Tribal Calendars' started by Susan Lynne Schwenger, Nov 2, 2014.

  1. Susan Lynne Schwenger

    Susan Lynne Schwenger The Final Synthesis - isbn 978-0-9939480-0-8 Staff Member

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    stonehenge-full-moon-590x442.

    Photo Credit: http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/12/27/the-longest-full-moon-of-the-year/

    The Start of The Year 2013 on The Six (6) Season Calendar was 28 DEC 2012

    This calendar used to consist of 6 seasons x 60 days = 360 days

    (after 1572, when The Gregorian Calendar was implented,

    it has been modified to The Gregorian Calendar, as follows:

    4 Gregorian Years = ((3 x (360+5) + 1 x (360+1+5))

    This Calendar is used by First Nations, Native American, The Metis, The Maori, and, The Aborginee of Australia

    The Winter Season begins on The Last Full Moon of December, which was 28 DEC 2012

    - All tribes utilize a 260 day calendar, along with a 360 day calendar

    which was modified to 360+5 days, in a regular year or 360+1+5 days in a leap year) after the year 1572.

    This calendar, is also known as The Ancient Year (360 days) Calendar,

    or The Thirteen (13) Moon Calendar

    ~ Susan Lynne Schwenger


    The Longest Full Moon of the Year

    with Ethan Siegal
    stonehenge-full-moon-590x442.
    “Tell me what you feel in your room when the full moon is shining in upon you
    and your lamp is dying out, and I will tell you how old you are,
    and I shall know if you are happy.”
    -Henri Frederic Amiel
    Tonight is a special night, although not for the reasons you may think.
    Yes, it’s just a few days after Christmas and before the new year,
    but tonight is the night of the Full Moon closest to the winter solstice.
    moon-on-dark-winter-night-600x450.
    Image credit: Judy Stone-Goldman.

    Up here in the northern hemisphere (above the Tropic of Cancer), December 21st corresponds to the winter solstice, or the shortest day in terms of hours-of-sunlight of the year.

    The Sun crests the horizon and rises to its lowest altitude in the sky
    [90° minus the Earth's axial tilt (23.5°) minus your latitude] of any day,
    setting after spending the shortest amount of time above the horizon of the entire year.
    winter_solstice_pivato_800c-600x275.
    Image credit & copyright: Danilo Pivato.

    Up where I am in Portland, Oregon, that means we get just 8 hours and 42 minutes of daylight
    on the solstice, where the Sun is above the horizon.

    But within two weeks (at most), either before or after the Solstice,
    you’ll be treated to the darkest Full Moon of the year.
    Sun_Earth_Moon-600x450.
    Image credit: 2001, A Space Odyssey.

    What, you've got a better Earth-Moon-Sun photo?

    With the Earth’s north pole maximally pointed away from the Sun,
    that means it’s pointed maximally towards the Moon:
    so this will be the Full Moon that gives you the most hours of moonlight
    of any day during the year:
    over fifteen hours of moonlight here where I am.
    And every moment of it is spectacular.
    3002089-600x600.
    Image credit: Babak A. Tafreshi / Dreamview.net, TWAN.

    This is not what moonrise looks like tonight! (Well, maybe in the southern hemisphere it does,
    but not here!) The bright sky, still relatively well-illuminated in the post-sunset hours,
    makes for a beautiful scene, but this photo was taken near the summer solstice
    from the Northern Hemisphere. If we look nearer the winter solstice, however,
    it isn’t your imagination: the sky gets darker more quickly near the winter solstice!
    5856943-21209060-thumbnail-600x400.
    Image credit: Tunç Tezel (TWAN), from last month's full Moon!
    What this means is that — if you look tonight — you’ll get a spectacular moonrise,
    where the Moon turns a blood red against the darkest backdrops of a full moonrise
    that you’ll see all year… and the same thing again at moonset just prior to dawn.
    snapshot-2008-02-14-11-37-01-600x362.
    Image source: unknown

    You’ll also see the full Moon achieve its highest altitude when it passes overhead,
    reaching 63.5° where I am tonight! (The formula is more complicated due to the Moon’s inclination
    to the Earth-Sun orbit.)

    The full Moon will light up the night sky for the longest amount of time at all northern (above 23.5°) latitudes tonight, and if you look closely, you might find a bright light located about 25 degrees away.
    708756633.
    Image credit: Richard Fleet of Newbury Astro Society (because it's already night in the UK).

    That would be Jupiter, near opposition and currently the brightest non-lunar object to grace the night sky.
    Although perhaps I should have told you about this last month, because on November 28th,
    when we had a full Moon on the other side of the solstice, the planet Jupiter was occulted
    by the Moon
    !
    The reappearance of our Solar System’s largest gas giant took just about two minutes
    from behind the limb of the Moon, and was fabulously videotaped through a telescope
    by Rafael Defavari! (You’ve got to see this!)

    So enjoy tonight’s amazing full Moon, the longest full Moon,
    giving you the most moonlight for the most hours when you need it the most:
    at the darkest time of the year!

    Ethan Siegal
    http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/12/27/the-longest-full-moon-of-the-year/
     

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